The Nobel Prize for lefties 2

 From Power Line:

Unfortunately, it may well be the case that [Paul]  Krugman won his award [this year, in Economics] due at least in part to his left-wing, anti-Bush commentary. Every year, we have occasion to note the leftist bias of the Nobel awards. The prizes seem to have become, in part, a method of rewarding Bush’s harshest critics, Al Gore and Jimmy Carter for example. If there’s a chemist out there who has written an anti-Bush op-ed, there may well be a Nobel Prize in his or her future.

The Nobel Prize is just another example of an institution whose veneration once crossed ideological lines, but that the left has long since captured. Other such institutions include the NAACP, the New York Times, Amnesty International, and (though it was never really venerated) the American Bar Association. The left’s "long march" through these institutions has deprived them of their credibility and their status as honest brokers.

In the case of the Nobel Prize, the money must be welcome. But as honors go, a Nobel Prize in anything relating to public policy is not much more meaningful than praise from the Daily Kos.

Posted under Commentary by Jillian Becker on Tuesday, October 14, 2008

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This post has 2 comments.

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  • Jillian Becker

    Dan W is right of course. And there have been famously anti-Left winners of the Economics Prize – the great Friedrich von Hayek for one.

    The Nobel Peace Prize – one of the original awards, but judged and bestowed by Norway, not Sweden – has become a prize for lefties, red or green. And so too, predominantly if not totally through the last few decades, has the Nobel Prize for Literature.

  • Dan W.

    Oh, and just to be clear, I’m not arguing that this award is somehow a “fake Nobel” or anything. The Sveriges Riksbank Prize is the only “Nobel” prize awarded in economics. It’s still the highest honor a person in the field of economics can receive, but economics was not a field awarded a prize in the original list set out by Alfred Nobel.