Palin cites the Tenth Amendment 5

She’s coming out fighting! Let’s cheer her on!

This is by Chelsea Schilling at WorldNetDaily (read it all here):

Gov. Sarah Palin has signed a joint resolution declaring Alaska’s sovereignty under the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution – and now 36 other states have introduced similar resolutions as part of a growing resistance to the federal government.
Just weeks before she plans to step down from her position as Alaska governor, Palin signed House Joint Resolution 27, sponsored by state Rep. Mike Kelly on July 10, according to a Tenth Amendment Center report. The resolution “claims sovereignty for the state under the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States over all powers not otherwise enumerated and granted to the federal government by the Constitution of the United States.”
Alaska’s House passed HJR 27 by a vote of 37-0, and the Senate passed it by a vote of 40-0.
According to the report, the joint resolution does not carry with it the force of law, but supporters say it is a significant move toward getting their message out to other lawmakers, the media and grassroots movements.
Alaska’s resolution states:
Be it resolved that the Alaska State Legislature hereby claims sovereignty for the state under the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States over all powers not otherwise enumerated and granted to the federal government by the Constitution of the United States.
Be it further resolved that this resolution serves as Notice and Demand to the federal government to cease and desist, effective immediately, mandates that are beyond the scope of these constitutionally delegated powers.
While seven states – Tennessee, Idaho, North Dakota, South Dakota, Oklahoma, Alaska and Louisiana – have had both houses of their legislatures pass similar decrees, Alaska Gov. Palin and Tennessee Gov. Phil Bredesen are currently the only governors to have signed their states’ sovereignty resolutions.
The resolutions all address the Tenth Amendment that says: “powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.

Gov. Sarah Palin has signed a joint resolution declaring Alaska’s sovereignty under the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution – and now 36 other states have introduced similar resolutions as part of a growing resistance to the federal government.

The resolutions all address the Tenth Amendment that says: “powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.

Just weeks before she plans to step down from her position as Alaska governor, Palin signed House Joint Resolution 27, sponsored by state Rep. Mike Kelly on July 10, according to a Tenth Amendment Center report. The resolution “claims sovereignty for the state under the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States over all powers not otherwise enumerated and granted to the federal government by the Constitution of the United States.”

Be it further resolved that this resolution serves as Notice and Demand to the federal government to cease and desist, effective immediately, mandates that are beyond the scope of these constitutionally delegated powers.

Alaska’s House passed HJR 27 by a vote of 37-0, and the Senate passed it by a vote of 40-0.

Be it resolved that the Alaska State Legislature hereby claims sovereignty for the state under the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States over all powers not otherwise enumerated and granted to the federal government by the Constitution of the United States.

According to the report, the joint resolution does not carry with it the force of law, but supporters say it is a significant move toward getting their message out to other lawmakers, the media and grassroots movements.

Alaska’s resolution states:

While seven states – Tennessee, Idaho, North Dakota, South Dakota, Oklahoma, Alaska and Louisiana – have had both houses of their legislatures pass similar decrees, Alaska Gov. Palin and Tennessee Gov. Phil Bredesen are currently the only governors to have signed their states’ sovereignty resolutions.

Posted under Conservatism, News, United States by Jillian Becker on Wednesday, July 22, 2009

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This post has 5 comments.

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  • Chris – pencil –

    You are arguing for tolerance.

    We are entirely for tolerance.

    Everyone should be free to pray whenever, wherever, and however they choose, in private or in public. No one has to join in public prayer if they don't want to.

    I think prayer is ridiculous. I would, wouldn't I, since I am an atheist?

  • Chris

    But since you did make the comment Ill reply while I'm waiting. I believe, as
    Ive stated, that everyone in a republic should not have laws controling whether or not they pray, when they pray, where they pray, or how they pray. Its not the governments business to be controling such matters for anyone . . . be they atheist or religious. Its creates needless tension between groups, accomplishes nothing, is a waste of taxpayer money, and is not the model of a truly diverse republic. Ben franklin never wanted there to be prayer police. I do not think that it is a practice that should be policed in any way. Ill add if its not already clear no one should be forced TO pray either. I really hope the host, whats her/his name I can't remember, agrees. I already know that student prayer is tolerated, but what if a teacher prays? What if the president prays? Isn't this constitutional as long as this president or this teacher is not forcing others to pray with him/her??? Thats my question. I'm really trying to get a feel for what this blogger thinks about this. No offense but . . . I was addressing the question to the host.

  • Chris

    I think Ill wait for the host of this blog to reply. It was to him/her I had this question addressed. I'm interested in knowing what the host of this blog thinks, not just someone passing through.

  • Chris

    hello, its pencil again. Ide just like to say I like your posts. That is, they do seem to be very informed. In my last comment I guess I was trying to make the point . . . that people of different religions and even non-religious need to stop trying to shove each others veiws down each others throtes by force of law. A key example is prayer. Anyone, even the president, should be allowed to either pray or even allowed to chose not to pray. That is, whether one prays or not or goes to church or not should be everyone's constitutionaly protected right. The more people think this way, the better off America will be. No more ALCU telling us we can't express our religion. No more Pope burning “heretics” at the stake. No more atheist dictators like Joseph Stalin killing everyone who stands in his way. This is the whole point of the constitution. It lets each of us go our own way within the limits of common law and limited government! Hope to hear what you think about this. Peace out

    • business traveler

      Actually, praying should be done at prayer stations (churches etc.), in private homes, or if silent and unobtrusive in public. A little dovening on the bus is OK, but no bending to the floor in airports, please.