Birds of a feather: Mandela, Gaddafi, Castro, Arafat, Mugabe 22

All four pictures copied, with gratitude, from Front Page.

See also our post of  June 11, 2013, Our need for idols: observations on Mandela and Gandhi.

Posted under Cuba, Libya, Palestinians, South Africa, Terrorism by Jillian Becker on Friday, December 6, 2013

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This post has 22 comments.

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  • Kerry

    I ran across this article from The Federalist. I think is worth the time to read. I especially liked the comments from Newt, and although I am no particular fan of his, I found his justifications so typical of Newtism. What I appreciate the most in the article is the manner in which McLaughlin draws our attention to the temperature of the times and the national stage on which Mandela found himself. It is always good, and indeed, IMPORTANT, to reflect on the international events and actions that led up to the era of Mandela. We sometimes forget all of the intrigue and only focus on the current actions. Anyway, enjoy.

    • Jillian Becker

      Kerry – did you forget to post the link? Or the title and source? We’d like to read the article. We like The Federalist.

      • Kerry
        • Jillian Becker

          Thank you, Kerry. It is a very good article, factual and intelligent. There are points of opinion in it with which I would contend, or which I would want to modify, but it is well worth reading, above all because it firmly places the events in southern Africa in the essential context of what was going on in the world at the time – the Cold War. The war between South Africa and the Cuba-assisted rebels in Angola was one of “the hot spots of the Cold War”, as I called them. I was in the Caprivi Strip in the mid- 80s as a researcher into terrorism, observing the conflict (and rather ingenuously learning how to fire a mortar across the Angolan border, which in retrospect I can see was not something a British citizen should have been doing. I later realized I had been acting in effect as a mercenary – but unpaid).

  • WmarkW

    Jillian, have you ever written anything contrasting Mandela to Mangosuthu Buthelezi. He was King of the Zulu nation during Mandela’s incarceration, and was considered an equally important apartheid opponent at the time, but was a strong anti-Marxist who feared South Africa going the way of Zaire.

    • Jillian Becker

      Yes, long ago – years before this websitewas created – I wrote about Buthelezi at length. He was also the subject of talks I gave to various audiences and at some international conferences. Unfortunately the articles and transcripts are now lost. What you say about him is true.

  • Kerry

    I am saddened to see all of the current and past US Presidents that will attend the funeral of Mandela in comparison to the number…0…that attended Margaret Thatcher’s funeral. Pathetic to the extreme, and a completely displaced sense of history and accomplishment.

    • Jillian Becker

      A very astute and important observation, Kerry, with which we ardently agree. By the way, not a single US president attended Churchill’s funeral! At least not officially. Eisenhower attended as a private citizen. Neither LBJ – then president – nor Humphrey his VP was there:

      http://www.powerlineblog.com/a

      • Kerry

        I had forgotten about that little detail to history. Thank you for pointing it out. Apparently our animosity toward our former countrymen is deep-seated in our psyche. It would certainly have been the ultimate in poor international protocol had Eisenhower not attended.

        • liz

          Yes, and “the ultimate in poor international protocol” is, pathetically, the standard practice of the present administration.

    • liz

      Yes, and I heard Obama ordered flags flown at half mast for 10 days for Mandela, although it was 0 for Thatcher.
      But of course – he was a fellow Communist!

  • rogerinflorida

    We are already being subjected to a torrent of what can only be called idolatry from some conservatives: Rush Limbaugh today, Mark Steyn last evening on the Hugh Hewitt show. Ms. Becker has this pegged in her June post, it is almost mass hysteria. Nelson Mandela may be an amiable and charismatic man, but make no mistake, he is a revolutionary black liberation communist who was prepared to use, and in fact did use, extreme violence against his enemies, his wife Winnie is a real piece of work.
    There is probably going to be even more murder of whites now, it remains to be seen if Britain particularly and Holland also have the courage to stand up against this and even arrange a mass evacuation of the remaining whites.
    It is instructive to compare the history of South Africa with, say, Detroit. RSA was a sparsely populated vast area when Europeans first arrived, but the strategic position of Cape Town, European led agricultural development and discoveries of vast mineral wealth changed RSA to a very significant first world nation and industrial power. This attracted huge numbers of Africans seeking work and economic opportunity not available in their home countries in Sub Saharan Africa. The population balance changed and blacks demanded political power, gaining it through violence supported by the perennial trouble makers Russia and China. RSA is now a black run country and is reverting to a typical black run African country, as Detroit has reverted to resemble a typical black run African city. Corruption, incompetence, the most mind boggling superstitions and appalling violence are now reality in RSA. It is my opinion that this trend will continue and worsen. God help those whites left there.

    • Jillian Becker

      It is a terrifying prospect.

      But … “God”, Roger?

      • rogerinflorida

        Just a figure of speech! What am I going to say: “Respect for Law and Order” help those whites left there?
        The prospect is terrible, it is possible that we have a Rwanda Hutu/Tutsi situation developing.

        • Kerry

          Roger, Have you actually lived in South Africa or spent any amount of time there. I have spent much time there, and I can tell you from my experience that it is not so dire as you think. Yes, there are some horrific situations and the murder rate is unacceptable, but then so is Detroit, or even parts of Washington, DC. When I lived in DC, there were parts of the city I would not go to even in the day! There will be no Rwanda situation in SA in my opinion, but staving that off will require that SA remain a key to international business which tends to keep a check on horrific activity.

          • rogerinflorida

            No I haven’t, only fairly brief visits. My opinion of what is going to happen there is formed from my knowledge of other post colonial situations, from working with many ex-pat South Africans (all white) who were universally gloomy. Your experience of US cities is an indicator, those areas you would not visit ” even during the day” are overwhelmingly occupied by African descendants.
            And lest you think I am just a knuckle dragging racist; when I lived in Hong Kong I visited many areas where I was the only white person, maybe for miles, and never felt threatened, indeed a common response was apologetic embarrassed half smiles from Mothers whose children pointed and stared at me.
            As for SA we will see, but I don’t think the indicators are good, in fact they are terrible.

            • Kerry

              Yes, there are indicators as you mention, but I see other factors that will change the situation. I have lived in the past for many years on the continent of Africa. I particularly know DRC, Ghana, Liberia and Sierra Leone very well, and like you I was the only white guy for miles. Being a black civilization is not necessarily a harbinger of doom. Ghana has had four changes of President and political party and no one died as a result. They even had a President die in office from a heart attack and they transitioned to the VP becoming Pres. It was peaceful by any measure.

              My point is that because of the “white” influence in SA there is probably a greater chance for success. Ties with stable countries due largely to trade will win the day for a certain degree of stability. I may be overly optimistic…I tend to be at times…but my knowledge of SA, despite the troubles, is that leadership will come forth. Zuma is not that leader by the way! They are weary of the continual conflict and racist tensions, and all have a need to build a life.

  • Kerry

    OK I am going gently enter the water here and risk the wrath of our friend Jillian. First, after reviewing the pictures above, I would remind everyone that with the exception of Castro, the other three were at one time or the other supported by the US government, and pictures are available with these tugs and our President….including kissing Arafat, by a US President, if I am not mistaken.

    I am not going to try to justify many of the beliefs and nefarious relationships of Mandela, but in his autobiography, “Long Walk to Freedom,” He shows his human side, both the accomplishments and the failures. His years of imprisonment leading up to his eventual Presidency, prepared him in unique ways to lead. His was not a knee-jerk get-even kind of leadership, and I believe he did much to try to soothe the horribly oppressive regime.

    I am aware of his dalliances with communists and dictators, but so did many of “OUR’ friends in those days. He sought help and support from whoever would or could give it.

    • Jillian Becker

      No wrath, Kerry. Appreciation. You make fair points. But our point is – they are all terrorists. No US president pictured with such creatures was a terrorist himself (not even Obama, though his friend and ghost-writer Bill Ayers was, and if Obama had been born a little earlier – who knows?).

      Here’s a fair assessment of Mandela:

      “Mandela began as a terrorist and never turned his back on
      monsters like Arafat and Castro, whom he considered brothers in arms. When he was released from prison by deKlerk, he showed unexpected statesmanship, counseling reconciliation rather than revenge, no small achievement in a country in which the “liberation” movement (led by Mandela’s wife and party) placed oil filled inner tubes around the necks of former comrades and set them on fire. But if a leader should be judged by his works, the country Mandela left behind is an indictment of his political career, not an achievement worthy of praise – let alone the unhinged adoration he is currently receiving across the political spectrum. South Africa today is the murder capital of the world, a nation where a woman is raped every 30 seconds, often by AIDs carriers who go unpunished, and where whites are anything but the citizens of a democratic country which honors the principles of equality and freedom. Liberated South Africa is one of those epic messes the Left created and promptly forgot about.”

      http://www.frontpagemag.com/2013/david-horowitz/nelson-mandela-1918-2013/

      • Kerry

        You are correct on the “necklacing” although I also believe he “repented” of his tacit support of that activity later in life. I also agree that what he left behind looks far different from what he envisioned, but that can be said of our Founder’s and of most civilizations. Just look at the Arab Spring revolutions; election after election has been deemed unfinished by those that protested and seemingly won.

        My point on our President’s being pictured with such thugs is that at times, when those thugs served our purposes, we were willing to look the other way and even openly support them. Mandela was no different in this respect. He needed whoever would help in the early days and often times even as late as 1994, some of that help came from the far left. He moderated much in his associations over his term as President.

        • Jillian Becker

          I’m not sure you are right that he “moderated much in his associations over his term as President”. As far as I can discover, he went on being an admirer of the Leftist tyrannies to the end, and a buddy of the tyrants who were still extant. He was on smiling terms with the democracies too, of course. They were necessary to the economic survival of South Africa. Castro wasn’t. Nor Mugabe.

          • Kerry

            I had to smile when I read your comment about the “smiling old man. With all the adulation, he had much to smile about. But he did no positive good for the black population of his country.” Reminds me of another black President…BHO.