“The Prophet Muhammad” did not exist 4

Muhammad the Prophet of Islam is fictitious.

In his new book Did Muhammad Exist? An Inquiry into Islam’s Obscure Origins, Robert Spencer demonstrates, with an impressive mass of detailed evidence and close logical reasoning, that Muhammad was invented, and that the Koran –  in all its versions – was written over a long stretch of time starting many decades after the imaginary life of the fictitious prophet ended (according to the fable) in 632 C.E.  

At a  joint meeting of the Middle East Forum and Gatestone Institute in New York City on April 24, 2012, the author spoke about his intentions in writing the book.

We quote from a report of his address by Tommaso Virgili of the Middle East Forum:

Did the Prophet Muhammad really exist, or was he a sacred myth fashioned by the Koran decades after his purported death? Robert Spencer has addressed this thorny question with a dual intent:

To serve the interests of freedom of expression as a rebellion against the tyranny of censorship by the likes of the Organization of the Islamic Cooperation and the leftist idolatry for political correctness, which attempt to silence any debate on Islamic issues.

To play in the Islamic world the same positive role that non-religious, scientific research played in Judaism and Christianity, triggering a rational debate that can lead to the rejection of strict literalism.

There is, he said “an abundance of historical evidence supporting this thesis” that Muhammad is a myth.

Particularly intriguing is the absolute absence of a mention whatsoever of Muhammad, Islam or the Koran, either by the Arab conquerors or the conquered, in written records, inscriptions, coins, etc. during 630-690, i.e. to the period of Muslim conquests following the (alleged) death of Muhammad.

Furthermore, the life of Muhammad is shrouded in mystery given that the first biographies were written no sooner than 125 years after his death, and it is well acknowledged by Muslim scholars, among others, that many of the hadiths which hand down sayings and actions of the Prophet are false, artfully created for political reasons.

Nor is the Koran itself a more reliable source: it is supposed to have been collected and distributed in its standard edition no later than in 653, but one cannot find any mention of it until the 690s, and the traces of Aramaic and Christian traditions inside the text indicate a well established contact with the conquered territories.

Indeed Robert Spencer demonstrates that there are plentiful and convincing signs of Christian and Jewish sources – deliberately distorted or misunderstood or both – for much of the Koran. In particular, a Syriac Christian document was plundered or plagiarized by the authors of the Koran – and in our opinion dumbed down even from the low standard of Christian documents. Dumb and dumber, one might say.

In conclusion, historical evidence tells a very different story from the traditional one, namely that of political and military events which occurred at a time when some Arabian tribes expanded at the expense of the “sick men” – the Persian and Byzantine empires – and which necessitated a glue to bind them together and to form a central focus of identification. And what could offer a better nucleus for the nascent Arab empire than religion?

We strongly recommend Did Muhammad Exist? An Inquiry into Islam’s Obscure Origins by Robert Spencer because, as he said, it is “a rebellion against the tyranny of censorship”. But also for reasons of our own. Islam is a revolting ideology and this meticulously researched and well reasoned study, by putting its lies and nonsense under the microscope of scholarship, is a serious blow against it. Wounding certainly. Crippling we hope. Death-dealing – time will tell.

Footnote; There is only one thing in the book we would take issue with: the theory that it is not a promise of 72 virgins that lures Muslim terrorists to paradise, but 72 raisins. We do not believe even a Muslim would kill himself for 72 raisins.

Posted under Commentary, Islam, Muslims, Reviews by Jillian Becker on Sunday, August 26, 2012

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This post has 4 comments.

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  • Jack

    This sounds like a great book. But what so intrigues me is the similarity to the origin of the Christ legend. As Price and others have argued, there was no historical Jesus. Jesus too started as a series of legends. I would bet that many of mankind’s religious prophets and icons started as legends.

    Spencer who is a Christian would, no doubt, defend the historicity of Jesus. That’s his blind spot. But still, he is one of the most heroic men in the Euro-American world for doing what he is doing; ie showing the reality of the world’s most evil religion.

    • Jillian Becker

      Agreed, Jack!

      You may like our own series on the invention of Jesus Christ:
      A man named Jesus or something like that (September 23, 2011); The invention of Christianity(October 28, 2011); Tread on me: the making of Christian morality (December 22, 2011); St.Paul: portrait of a sick genius (January 7, 2012); Pauline Christianity: a mystical salad(February 26, 2012), and especially The fictitious life of Jesus Christ (April 7, 2012).

      • Frank

        And for those of us with a short attention span there’s this video.

    • liz

      Yes, Moses, Jesus, and Muhammed all have the same origins – in legend and myth. And each one built on the mythology of the previous ones. Every on of them, as Jillian points out, “written over a long stretch of time starting many decades after the imaginary life of the fictitious prophet ended”. How ironic that centuries of holy wars have been fought and persecutions carried out over not only fiction, but unoriginal, plagiarized, “dumbed down” fiction! And how true, it only gets dumber as time goes on.