Civilization 2

A poem by Bruce Bawer:

That civilization may not sink,
Its great battle lost,
Quiet the dog, tether the pony
To a distant post.
Our master Caesar is in the tent
Where the maps are spread,
His eyes fixed upon nothing,
A hand upon his head.

–W.B. Yeats, “Long-Legged Fly”

*

Groaning toward his eightieth year, the Free
World’s leader, on this pleasant August day,
Dozes calmly under an apple tree,
Dreaming of that episode with Corn Pop,
Of children’s fragrant hair, banana splits,
White sails skimming over Delaware Bay.
— No, actually, he’s at a photo op
In the White House, opposite the premier
Of Israel, and — ah — he’s fallen asleep,
His head bowed, his shoulders slumped: the shoulders
Upon which our civilization sits.

His aides, seized by a now-familiar fear,
Rustle through their thick, important folders.
But what’s to be done? Look beyond the seas
To every continent, and there you’ll find
Cruisers and aircraft carriers, tanks and jeeps,
Awaiting orders from this man whose eyes
Are shut in slumber; squadrons of GIs
Prepared, at his command, to sacrifice
Their lives for the liberty of mankind;
Bombers poised to fly when he gives the nod.
But him? He’s nodded off; he’s flying blind;
And all the mighty forces must stand down,
For it’s that addled head that wears the crown:
Long as he’s in the Oval Office, odd
Though it sounds, he’s the closest thing to God;
Long as America still rules the waves
(And he, with his rank company of knaves,
Foolishly and brazenly waives the rules),
All civilization rests upon one mind.

So when you vote, think what you’re voting for.
It shouldn’t matter if a candidate
For president’s presentable and kind
(Or seems to be), or comes off as a boor,
Or if that individual’s maligned
By media boobs: dismiss such chatter
From your mind. And no, it shouldn’t matter
Who has more estrogen or melanin
Or who might be a Basque or Bedouin.
You’re not picking a morning talk-show host
Or someone you can call your friends and boast
Of having voted for because he’s gay.
For once, please put such childish thoughts away
And think like an adult, a citizen
Of the Republic that transmogrified
Ideas of what a human life could be,
The land for which your forebears fought and died.
For God’s sake, do the homework. Do the math.
Learn to recognize a sociopath.
Learn what it means to be custodian
Of your hard-won freedom, of your nation,
Of your — your children’s — civilization.

Just this once, instead of relentlessly
Finding fault with all the Founding Founders,
Why don’t you attempt to be worthy of
Them — to show respect, if you can’t show love —
And to be worthy of the wondrous land
They brought into being? You have a hand,
When you cast your vote, in shaping its fate,
In deciding whether or not our great
American experiment founders
Or survives. So choose as your head of state
Someone who loves your country, first of all,
And who understands how to wield power
In its service; who can be a bright ball
Of fire in that country’s darkest hour;
Who knows good from evil, knows foe from friend,
And knows when duty tells him not to bend;
And who, unlike the man who tends to doze
In the middle of the day, and who weeps
Inexplicably at a lectern, knows
To cry in private, and who barely sleeps.

Posted under Miscellaneous by Jillian Becker on Tuesday, August 31, 2021

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Happy birthday, President Trump! 6

Posted under Miscellaneous by Jillian Becker on Monday, June 14, 2021

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Donald Trump: nothing less than noble 2

We are delighted with this praise of Donald Trump by Bruce Bawer:

I cast my first presidential vote ever for Gerald Ford and my second for Ronald Reagan. But after that, the party’s presidential candidates, whether they won or lost, held little appeal for me.  They all used ugly, malevolent gay-bashing to win votes, implying that gay people were the greatest threat of all to American values. Trump—“vulgar” Trump—never stooped that low. He never came close. During the 2016 campaign, I kept holding my breath waiting for it to happen—it had to happen; he was a Republican—and it never happened.

Vulgar? Nasty? No, in thunder. He was nothing less than noble. Not just in the way he talked to gays, but also in the way he addressed blacks, women, Latinos, Asians, Appalachian coal miners, Midwestern farmers, the military, the police. There was not a hint of Democratic identity-group pandering, and none of the awkwardness of a George H.W. Bush, say, trying desperately to pretend to relate to people about whose lives he was utterly clueless.

Yes, Trump was a billionaire, but he had spent his adult life on construction sites rubbing shoulders with plumbers, carpenters, welders, roofers, glaziers, electricians, and other working stiffs; and he had hired and promoted—and fired—on the basis of excellence and nothing else.

And that was only a small part of what he did. He effected changes in the GOP that I had been dreaming of my whole adult life. His love for America, and respect for Americans, were palpable. He made most of the GOP presidential hopefuls before him, and most of the Republicans in Congress during his own tenure, look like wimps, hacks, careerists, phonies, cowards.

He knew what the real issues were. He knew who the real enemies were. He knew the real America, and was fully on its side. And through it all, he was never afraid to speak the truth, loud and clear.

It is maddeningly frustrating to know that, thanks to the vicious prejudice and stupidity of the media, most voters will never hear or read such an opinion.

Bruce Bawer’s eulogy to President Trump is part of an article written mainly in defense of David Horowitz, who has been a warrior against political evil – aka the Left – for most of his adult life, ever since he converted from the religion of Communism in which he had been raised. In Bawer’s opinion, as in ours, both Trump and Horowitz are American heroes.

Posted under Miscellaneous by Jillian Becker on Thursday, May 13, 2021

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A note to new visitors 20

Since we were “suspended for 60 days” by Facebook – ostensibly  for reproducing a photograph with a mildly funny but harmless caption – we have had a most welcome increase of visitors to this site.

We assume that at least some of the newcomers have migrated from our Facebook territory. But we  cannot be sure, because we have had no new commenters here. Daily we look for familiar names and pseudonyms but so far have not found them.

So if you are a new reader, whether formerly of our Facebook page or not, please:-

Click on the title of a post, or on the word “comments” underneath it, to get to the comment page.

Sign up for Disqus if asked to.

Comment freely. Difference of opinion is welcome (but not obscenities, ad hominem insults to us, advertisements, or sheer lunatic ravings).

Posted under Miscellaneous by Jillian Becker on Sunday, April 18, 2021

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Killers 7

16 months into the Covid-19 pandemic, about 3 million people across the world are said to have died of it. (Data from Johns Hopkins University.)

Approximate population of the world: 7.9 billion

More world wide statistics:

Approximate annual deaths from car accidents: 1.3 million

Approximate annual deaths from malaria: 1-3 million

Approximate annual deaths from heart disease: 8.8 million

Approximate annual deaths from starvation: 9 million

Approximate annual deaths from cancer: 10 million

Estimated deaths from Spanish flu post-WWI: 20-50 million

Approximate annual deaths of unborn babies by abortion: 56 million

Approximate deaths caused variously by World War Two: 75 million

Estimated deaths inflicted by Communist regimes: 60-150 million*

Approximate deaths in the name of Religion (all but one in the last millennium, and with underestimates and many omissions in the list): 195 million

 

For a list of deaths by religion that is interesting to read though inaccurate – as all such lists must be since the count of deaths and the certainty of their cause can never be verified – go here.

Note: Wars have been waged by regimes which were officially atheist – such as those waged by and in Soviet Russia – but no war has ever been fought (or massacre carried out) in the name of atheism, or in order to advance or impose atheism.

 

*From Wikipedia:

In 1985, John Lenczowski, director of European and Soviet Affairs at the United States National Security Council, wrote an article in The Christian Science Monitor in which he stated that the “number of people murdered by communist regimes is estimated at between 60 million and 150 million, with the higher figure probably more accurate in light of recent scholarship”.

Posted under Miscellaneous by Jillian Becker on Sunday, April 18, 2021

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Thomas Sowell pays tribute to Walter Williams 1

'A Great Loss for America': RIP Walter Williams

We mourn the loss of Professor Walter Williams (1936-2020), a great man, a great thinker.

We looked forward to reading what another great man and great thinker, Thomas Sowell, would say about his friend Walter Williams.

Today (December 3, 2020) Thomas Sowell writes at Townhall:

Walter Williams loved teaching. Unlike too many other teachers today, he made it a point never to impose his opinions on his students. Those who read his syndicated newspaper columns know that he expressed his opinions boldly and unequivocally there. But not in the classroom.

Walter once said he hoped that, on the day he died, he would have taught a class that day. And that is just the way it was, when he died on Wednesday, December 2, 2020.

He was my best friend for half a century. There was no one I trusted more or whose integrity I respected more. Since he was younger than me, I chose him to be my literary executor, to take control of my books after I was gone.

But his death is a reminder that no one really has anything to say about such things.

As an economist, Walter Williams never got the credit he deserved. His book Race and Economics is a must-read introduction to the subject. Amazon has it ranked 5th in sales among civil rights books, 9 years after it was published.

Another book of his, on the effects of economics under the white supremacist apartheid regime in South Africa, was titled South Africa’s War Against Capitalism. He went to South Africa to study the situation directly. Many of the things he brought out have implications for racial discrimination in other places around the world.

I have had many occasions to cite Walter Williams’ research in my own books. Most of what others say about higher prices in low income neighborhoods today has not yet caught up to what Walter said in his doctoral dissertation decades ago.

Despite his opposition to the welfare state, as something doing more harm than good, Walter was privately very generous with both his money and his time in helping others.

He figured he had a right to do whatever he wanted to with his own money, but that politicians had no right to take his money to give away, in order to get votes.

In a letter dated March 3, 1975, Walter said: “Sometimes it is a very lonely struggle trying to help our people, particularly the ones who do not realize that help is needed.”

In the same letter, he mentioned a certain hospital which “has an all but written policy of prohibiting the flunking of black medical students”.

Not long after this, a professor at a prestigious medical school revealed that black students there were given passing grades without having met the standards applied to other students. He warned that trusting patients would pay — some with their lives — for such irresponsible double standards. That has in fact happened.

As a person, Walter Williams was unique. I have heard of no one else being described as being “like Walter Williams”.

Holding a black belt in karate, Walter was a tough customer. One night three men jumped him — and two of those men ended up in a hospital.

The other side of Walter came out in relation to his wife, Connie. She helped put him through graduate school — and after he received his Ph.D., she never had to work again, not even to fix his breakfast.

Walter liked to go to his job at 4:30 AM. He was the only person who had no problem finding a parking space on the street in downtown Washington. Around 9 o’clock or so, Connie — now awake — would phone Walter and they would greet each other tenderly for the day.

We may not see his like again. And that is our loss.

Posted under Miscellaneous by Jillian Becker on Thursday, December 3, 2020

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Lonely celebration 9

Home alone?

We wish all our readers, visitors, commenters, critics, good feasting on this first Thanksgiving of the new era of American tyranny.

Posted under Miscellaneous by Jillian Becker on Thursday, November 26, 2020

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Decadence on show 25

Image may contain: 4 people, people standing and shoes, text that says 'Men's Fall Fashion 2020 by Gucci'

Selected from our Facebook comments on this photo, one by Jeanne Shockley:

Is there a young woman out there who would seriously consider marrying this or having its baby?

Our reply:

No. And that’s the whole idea. The fashion for transgendering (rendering people sterile), the low fertility rates of Western countries, encouragement of abortion, the anti-family agenda, the “MeToo” nonsense, feminism, all point to the same thing – the dwindling away of the free enlightened peoples of the earth. It is the top policy of the Left.

Even more than the ugly and ridiculous clothes, the sickly epicene model with his apathetic droop tells the story of our time: the decline of the West.

Posted under Miscellaneous by Jillian Becker on Wednesday, September 23, 2020

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The song of Joe Biden 2

 

Posted under Miscellaneous by Jillian Becker on Saturday, August 8, 2020

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Atheist conservative aphorisms 7

To start a lively discussion, we posted these statements on our Facebook page today.

The lively discussion followed. Maybe it will follow here too.

Gods did not create Man; Man created gods.

Religion not only teaches untruth, it excludes the search for truth.

There is no Mind presiding over this universe.

Mind came into existence at this end of evolution, not before evolution began.

Existence has no purpose.

You cannot measure the value of human life because human life is the only measure of value.

Whether or not we have free will, we must live as if we have it, so to all intents and purposes we have it.

Many a belief survives persecution but not critical examination.

Justice is elusive, but judgment is inescapable.

 

(The last two are among our Articles of Reason listed under Pages in our margin.)

Posted under Miscellaneous by Jillian Becker on Tuesday, April 14, 2020

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